Which is the best exterior wood treatment?

The sun is out and temperatures are on the rise. This is the time when we venture out to the garden to survey the surroundings, and draw up the list of maintenance tasks.

When talking about exterior wood finishes, there’s always an assumption that it’s about the decking, garden shed or fence. Although these are indeed the most common garden features that need maintenance after a winter of wind, rain and freezing temperatures, wooden window frames, doors and porches should also be checked and given attention if required.

It’s all about the knowledge

A question we get asked a lot here at Wood Finishes Direct is “What is the best exterior wood treatment?”. Unfortunately, there’s no single product that is better than another for every project and type of wood. In fact, deciding what product should be used can be a complex matter. That’s why we invest heavily in the training of our sales and service team, or as we call them, the SAS team. All of our support staff are rigorously trained so that they’re familiar with the products we stock, their properties and their suitability for any number of given scenarios. This means that we’re always able to give expert advice and guidance on which products and brands are best suited to your project .

top-wood-finishing-brands

Just some of the top brands available at Wood Finishes Direct

Exterior wood finishing types

Essentially, there are two types of exterior wood treatments, those that are absorbed into the surface of the wood such as oil based products and those that form a protective coating on the surface of the wood, both of which have their own unique characteristics and benefits.

Penetrative Wood Treatments

Penetrative wood treatments are the type of products that soak into the wood and protect from within such as decking oils, shed & fence treatments. These products are predominantly oil and wax based. They work by penetrating then drying in the surface grain of the timber to provide a tough, durable, weather resistant surface.

The key benefit of this type of product is that they are very easy to apply and maintain. When the finished surface starts to look tired and worn, it’s simply a case of re-applying a fresh coat. No need to sand, strip back or remove the old finish. Wood oils are very forgiving for patch repairs meaning that localised areas of wear are very easy to repair and blend in with the surrounding areas. Leading brands that specialise in these types of exterior wood finishing products include Osmo, Ronseal, BarrettineCuprinol and Holzol.

Exterior coating systems

What was once the realm of paints and exterior wood varnishes is now dominated by an array of ultra modern wood coating systems. Whereas old paints and varnishes had a reputation for cracking, flaking and peeling, modern coating systems have been scientifically developed to withstand the effects of weathering and the constant movement of the timber as a result of moisture and temperature changes.

Modern exterior wood coatings are flexible and durable meaning that they rarely need to be stripped back to bare wood if maintained correctly, a firm favourite for exterior joinery such as wooden window frames and doors. Brands such as Sadolin and Sikkens are designed in such a way that as the top coat wears over time, it starts to lose some of its colour and sheen. This is an indicator that the finish needs maintenance. Surfaces that require maintenance can be restored by following a few simple steps.

  • Wipe down with Methylated Spirit to degrease the old finish.
  • Lightly sand the surface to remove any ingrained surface dirt and debris. This also provides a key for the new top coat.
  • Wipe down a second time after sanding with Methylated Spirit to remove all traces of sanding dust and any residual grease from hands and finger tips.
  • Ones dry, a fresh top coat can be applied to restore the appearance and maximise protection of the timber.

Other brands that specialise in exterior coatings, translucent and opaque include Dulux Trade and Crown Paints. Also see Sadolin’s Superdec Opaque Wood Protection finish.

Any Questions?

If you have an exterior wood care project to tackle and are not sure which product to choose, give our resident wood experts a call. They’re able to provide free, expert wood finishing advice, so that you can make a well informed choice on which products are suitable for your project.

As well as giving advice, support and help, we also like to see the results of completed projects. If you have any before, during and after project pictures, and would like to share them with us and our community, please let us know.

117 Responses to “Which is the best exterior wood treatment?”

  1. BARBARA Says:

    Hi
    We currently have a dark stain on wood tops and would like a limed light grey effect. Which OSMO Products to use. Also an Indian Sandstone Floor internally which us impossible to clean. How to clean and possible paint to protect for future use in high traffic areas. Also has to be non slip for animals. Kind Regards. Barbara

  2. Sam Taylor-Casey Says:

    Hello Barbara,

    Thank you for your inquiry. You will need to remove the existing finish before you can apply a lighter colour as it is unlikely to work unless applying an opaque finish and this would depend on the current finish of the wood. The Polyx Oils need to soak into the surface of the wood to work effectively and you may have something on the wood that prevent penetration. If you would like to email me with more details about the area to be finished and I would be happy to advice you further.

    I believe that there are some Sandstone sealers out there or a product such as Thompsons water sealer could be used but I am not the best to advice on sealing stone I’m afraid. If there is anything further you would like to ask or you do wish to discuss further you can email me on wood@finishes.direct

    All the Best Sam.

  3. sandra Says:

    My daughter has had an extension and now has large timber posts supporting a canopy over the front door. I thought I would give 2 coats of cuprinol and then use a dark coloured sikkens. Would this be the best way to stain and preserve the wood? Is it ok to use clear cuprinol then a sikkens with a stain or can you suggest something else? Thanks Sandra

  4. Sam Says:

    Hello Sandra,

    I would not recommend the Cuprinol and the Sikkens together. Ideally the Sikkens should only be used with other Sikkens products and for the best finish on new wood, the Sikkens Cetol HLS Plus followed by the Sikkens Cetol Filter 7 Plus. This will give great protection to the wood. If you have a read up of the products and feel free to let me know if you have any further questions.

    All the Best Samantha.

  5. Jon Says:

    Hi
    I have recently built a pergola in my garden. On three sides around the bottom 2.5 to 3 foot I have put a fence topped with some 6×2 timber. I anticipate people to lean on it and rest glasses and cups on it. I’m looking for help to prepare and and choose the right varnish for a natural looking tough easy to maintain surface. I get the image of a good old fashioned wooden bar counter look to it.
    Hope you can help thanks for your time.

  6. Sam Says:

    Hello Jon,

    You could have a look the Sadolin Classic Wood Protection as an option there is a variety of colours available including the Light Oak and Natural. This is a varnish with flexibility and durability for exterior wood. If you have a read up of the product and feel free to let me know if you have any further questions, I am happy to help. Always try a test area first.

    All the best Samantha.

  7. Kath Says:

    Hi,
    We have two old wooden carts which we are in the process of restoring. We are anticipating that they will stay outside from spring to autumn with a variety of flowerpots on them. Any advice on which type of preservative would be best would be much appreciated.
    Thanks
    Kath

  8. Sam Says:

    Hello Kath,

    Thank you for your enquiry, you could have a look at the Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative. This will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot. And then to give protection from water ingress and UV, apply a Decking Oil.

    Areas of wood with pots on can be susceptible to damage and its worth taking then off periodically to clean the area and remove any dead flower petals or leaves.

    If you have a read up of the products and feel free to come back to me if you have any further questions.

    All the Best Samantha.

  9. Ben Says:

    Hi

    I have made some large raised beds out of Scaffolding boards that I have sanded back to clean wood. I’d like to keep their natural color but properly protect them for as long as possible because removing the soil and treating inside and out will be a nightmare.

    What is the best treatment to use?

    thanks in advance
    Ben

  10. Sam Says:

    Hello Ben,

    You could have a look at the Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative which will help prevent mould, mildew and rot and has wax to make the wood water repellent. Two coats of this will be good and you could follow that up with two coats of an oil such as Barrettine Decking Oil to improve the protection even more.

    And ideally line the bed with some suitable liner to help protect the wood even further. I hope that helps and feel free to come back to me if you have any further questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  11. daz Says:

    Hi I have just put up a canopy and porch sitting on 5 inch treated posts I want to know the best looking oak stain or oil for the posts and facia board

    Thanks Daz

  12. Sam Says:

    Hello Daz,

    Thank you for your enquiry, could you email me with a little more details, for example what type of treatment is currently on there and what type of wood are you treating. Will be happy to advice on the products that would suit your needs. You can email me at wood@finishes.direct

    Kind regards Samantha.

  13. Diane Says:

    I have a North facing Oak front door, it has been varnish in the past but has not stood up to the weather and is now patchy. What is the best treatment for it now.

  14. Sam Says:

    Hello Diane,

    Thank you for getting in touch. For a door that is particularly exposed you may find it better to apply a product that is quick and easy to maintain over time. Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra is an oil that soaks into the surface of the wood, and helps to make the wood moisture repellent and slows down the silvering process.

    Then a top up of oil annually will help to maintain the protection longer still. You can simply re apply a coat without the need to sand back, just ensure the door is clean and dry. The first application of this will need to be to bare wood, any varnish remaining will prevent the oil from penetrating the wood and protecting effectively.

    I hope this helps and feel free to get back to me if you have any further questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  15. Chris Leach Says:

    Hi I have purchased a wooden framed gazebo it has been stored for three years. I Have no knowledge of wether it has been treated in the past or what with if it has. Can you please advise my best options.

    Thanks
    Chris Leach

  16. Sam Says:

    Hello Chris,

    The first thing to do is carry out a water test. Splash some water at the wood and see if it beads off the wood, if it does then there is likely something on the wood that is still protecting it. If it soaks in (don’t use too much water) then you may be able to consider applying a fresh treatment.

    If you do the test and then feel free to email me at wood@finishes.direct with the results and maybe a photo of the wood to be treated and I can advise from there.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  17. Geoff Davies Says:

    Hi We have a vertical wooden post at the corner of a porch I would say approx 6inch sq.
    It is old but in good condition and a surveyor recommended we keep it. We are about to have it clad along with the wooden windows to be replaced with UPVC. I was thinking about stripping the paint (which is flaking) and giving the post some sort of protection before they start on the porch. What would you recommend?
    Thanks
    Geoff

  18. Sam Says:

    Hello Geoff,

    Thank you for getting in touch. If the post is exposed to the outside world then a good quality preserver would be recommended Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative offers great protection against mould, mildew and rot. It also contains wax to repel moisture.

    If the post is inside the porch then a couple of thin coats of Hard Wax Oil will give a natural and durable finish to the wood. Always try a test area first and if you have any questions about these products please do feel free to let me know.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  19. Brian Atkinson Says:

    Hi Sam, I have recently purchased an 8′ x 5′ shed as a flat pack, sides, roof and floor, it’s already coated in factory preserver but they recommend it be recoated in more protection. Once the shed is erected and in position, because of limited space, one side will be difficult if nigh on impossible to re-treat, could you recommend a long lasting protection, especially for the side that’s close to the rear of a concrete garage. Cheers Brian.

  20. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Brian,

    Thank you for your enquiry. I can recommend a whole range of products and some will last longer than others. Essentially all treatments will need a top up over time. The one that should be longer lasting is a combination of Sadolin Classic Wood Protection and the Sadolin Extra Durable Woodstain. These two will give a long lasting protection to the wood.

    It is flexible and water repellent. A test area should be carried out to ensure that there is no adverse reaction to the preservative already on there. If you have a read up of the product and feel free to get back to me if you have any further questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  21. Jim Rooks Says:

    I constructed a pergola and rather that shingle I used fiberglass. I have sanded the fiberglass in preparation of painting with acrylic water proofing and sealer. I worry that some sanded areas may have exposed the untreated wood beneath. Since the resin epoxy is clear it is difficult to pinpoint where the exposed areas may be but primarily on corners. Would you recommend a penetrate to rub over these areas before painting?

  22. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Jim,

    Thank you for your enquiry. For exposed areas of wood you could have a look at the Barrettine Premier Wood Preserver. This will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot and it also contains some wax to repel moisture.

    If you take a look at the product and feel free to come back to me if you have and questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  23. Chris Says:

    Hi.Ive just had a new shed put up today .They said it had been treated for rot and fungi but I need too put a water base treatment too water tight it .what would you recommend as also wants it clear or natural wood as dont want a colour.
    Thank you Chris.

  24. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good afternoon Chris,

    We often recommend oils for exterior projects as they are not only easy to apply but also easy to maintain and repair. The Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment is a good option. It is clear and protective, with UV filters to help slow down the natural silvering caused by the sun.

    To get an idea of how it will darken the wood, you can wipe a damp cloth over the bare wood. For alternatives or further advice please do not hesitate to get in touch.

    All the Best Samantha.

  25. Col Says:

    Hi,

    I have a large area of planed wood garden border fencing to protect – something like 300 uprights of 4″ x 72″ incl posts. Would you recommend a particular product that is good value for such a large area? thank you. Col

  26. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Col,

    You could have a look at the Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative. It’s great for helping to prevent mould, mildew and rot. And also contains some wax to help make the wood moisture repellent. It comes in a range of colours and is one of our most popular finishes. If you have a read up of the product and feel free to get back to me if you have any questions.

    All the Best Samantha.

  27. mick robinson Says:

    i have built a porch in wet oak and the customer wood like to put a protective coat on preferable to keep it looking light thankyou what wood you recomend please

  28. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Mick,

    Wet or Green Oak has a high moisture content. Because of this we do not recommend applying a finishing product. Many products will not adhere to wet wood and those that do are sealing in the moisture making the wood susceptible to mould and mildew over time.

    People often use green wood in order to get the natural shifting and cracking that comes with the drying out of the timber. As it changes shape and takes on character. Once the wood is dry you can then consider application of a protective treatment and if you would like to email me with details of the colour or finish that you would like our email is wood@finishes.direct.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  29. Rob Mellor Says:

    Hi Sam,

    My wife and I have recently ordered a Tanalised Timber Summerhouse from Cheshire Sheds. They recommend using a Sadolin wood Protection but they have such a vast range and, when questioned, Sadolin recommended either their Ultimate wood Treatment or Superdec Opaque Wood Protection. Cheshire Sheds recommended a Translucent Protection, to bring out the grain. Also, to add to our confusion, when we went into our local Sadolin Dealer, Bromborugh Paints, they recommended Osmo 420, as a better alternative. Help!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  30. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Rob,

    There are so many products out there that is does become a mind field when it comes to choosing what is best for your project. Essentially all those products will be suitable, the Sadolin products are surface sealers, varnish or paint type products that dry on the surface and are fairly long lasting. When they start to break down and peel and flake they need removal in order to re apply new coats. But they have the benefit of lasting up to around 5-8 years depending on exposure and weather.

    We often recommend oils rather than surface sealers as they are far easier to maintain over time. They soak into the surface of the wood and will not peel and flake over time. They will simple wear away naturally and give a shorter time span of protection. The benefit comes in that you do not have to strip back the oil that remains, simply ensure the surface is clean and dry and then re-coat. So the Osmo Protection Oil Extra is ideal if you would like a natural, clear finish to your wood.

    One other thing to consider is a good quality preservative to be applied first. This will help to prevent mould mildew and rot, and the Sadolin or Osmo will be a top coat product that will slow down the silvering process and make the wood moisture repellent.

    I hope that helps and I am happy to answer any questions you have, feel free to email me on wood@finishes.direct

    All the Best Samantha.

  31. barry luxton Says:

    hello, I am installing an air dried oak beam 200mm square, across the garden at high level to grow plants across the patio, connect to the kitchen extension, using stainless steel wires, a continental open roofed patio area. It has been suggested to protect this beam with linseed oil. The issue, oak does not allow for deep penetration. How many coats and is it recommended to dilute the first, primer coat?

    Thank you in anticipation.

  32. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Barry,

    Linseed can be used for your project however it will offer limited protection, have a long drying time and require a number of coats to be applied, up to 5. It will then need topping up regularly, around every six months to maintain its durability.

    For Oak I would recommend the Barrettine Teak Oil. It is a thin oil designed for use on hardwoods such as oak. It will make the wood moisture repellent and allow it to silver naturally. It only require two very thin coats to be applied and so a litlle goes a long way.

    I hope this helps and if you have any questions please feel free to get back in touch.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  33. Pauline Says:

    I have two fresh sawn gate posts 200mm square. What would be the best thing to use to protect the posts. I want to try and keep the posts a natural lighter colour. I also have a new shed which has been pre treated. The are a medium brown and would like to make them a lighter colour. Is my only option to use something like Cuprinol Garden shades?

  34. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Pauline,

    You could have a look at the Preservative to be applied first. This will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot. Then two thin coats of the Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra. This will help to slow down the silvering process and make the wood moisture repellent.

    It will darken the wood slightly to give what we call the ‘wet look’ and you can get an idea of this by wiping a damp cloth over the surface of the wood. It will leave the wood looking and feeling very natural.

    For the shed, lightening wood can be difficult and applying an opaque finish is more likely to get the best result. Cuprinol Garden Shades is a possible option and is available in sample sizes to allow you to try a test area first.

    I hope that helps and if you have any questions please do not hesitate to get in touch.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  35. John Owen Says:

    Dear Samantha ,
    Guidance please ,
    I am about to replace the ,ship-lap T&G ,external wood surround on my bungalow,about 100 m linear length .
    This will be bare wood ,can you please tell me how best to prepare and best finish for this .Dark brown ,mahogany Matt finish preferred .
    Being 78 yrs of age ,the minimum of work and hopefully about 10 yrs life .
    Many thanks ,
    John

  36. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello John,

    Thank you for getting in touch. For a long lasting finish you could have a look at the Sikkens Cetol HLS Plus. This has a range of colours and you can apply 2-3 coats for a semi gloss, natural looking finish. It is brush application and if you are able to apply to both sides before installing this will also prolong the protection to the wood.

    I would expect this to last for a minimum of 5 years and possibly longer, depending on how exposed to the elements it is. A top up coat at the 5 year mark may help to prolong even further.

    I hope that helps and if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to get in touch.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  37. Michael Says:

    Hi

    I need some advice please. I have just had a new decking built. The actual decking is composite but the sides and railings are a soft wood. Which is best to protect the wood, Osmo or berratine?

    Many thanks

    Michael

  38. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Micheal,

    I would recommend a basecoat of Barrettine Premier Universal Preservative first, this will help to prevent mould mildew and rot. Once this is dry an application of Exterior Oil would be recommended. Oils are easier to apply, maintain and repair over time and for one with not only moisture repellency but also UV protection. You could look at the Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra. This is our best oil in terms of slowing down the silvering process.

    If you have a read up of these products and feel free to get back to me if you have any further questions. Always try a test area first.

    All the Best Samantha.

  39. john shaw Says:

    Hi Samantha
    I have read with interest your questions and reply and have a project in hand which i would appreciate your advice The outside wood cladding on my house west facing west of scotland red cedar strip is looking the worse for wear after 30 years flaking and peeling The wood facing is still servicable and i do not wish to go to great expense renewing it Area is triangular approx10m across x5mht Product and application please
    Many thanks
    john

  40. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello John,

    Thank you for getting in touch. A good option for an exposed area is some of the products from the Sikkens Range. In particular you could have a look at the Sikkens Cetol HLS Plus. It is recommended for use on bare wood and so I would recommend removing all the pre-existing product, especially as it is peeling and flaking as this will continue to get worse.

    Once back to bare wood 3 coats of the HLS Plus is ideal for use on cladding. It is available in a range of colours and will last around two years with a 3 coat system, before you will need to consider applying a top up coat. For many it will last longer, but 2 years is the guide from Sikkens. Coverage will vary depending on the condition of the timber and so for your slightly aged wood it may be on the higher side.

    I hope this helps and do feel free to get back to me if you have any questions.

    All the best Samantha

  41. Anjila Says:

    I have apple tree slices from the trunk of my old tree .. I’m turning one into an outside stool what would be the best way to preserve this please

  42. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Anjila,

    If the wood has dried out then the first recommendation would be a preservative to help to prevent mould, mildew and rot.

    Then a top coat product to seal and help keep the wood moisture repellent, for a clear oil that will help to slow down the silvering effect there is Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra. It will darken the wood slightly to give what we call the ‘wet look’.

    If you are looking to add some colour or something different just let me know and I can make some alternate recommendations. If the wood is freshly cut and has not dried out yet you may need to allow it to weather for a while as treatments are not recommended for woods that have a high moisture content.

    I hope that helps and always try a test area first.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  43. Peter Vaughan Says:

    I have just built an extension which is clad externally in marine ply. The wood does not come into contact with the ground. It is a uniform mid brown colour and I would like to stain it with a colour eg blue or grey. Also, I am unsure whether I should also be using a wood preservative treatment. I would greatly appreciate your advice. Peter Vaughan

  44. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Peter,

    Thank you for getting in touch. Can you tell me if there is any treatment currently on the cladding? This can have an impact on what I can advise.

    If you are treating bare wood then I would recommend a preservative to help to prevent mould, mildew and rot. And then a top coat product that will make the wood moisture repellent and offer UV protection. Osmo Natural Oil Woodstain has a good range of colours to choose from.

    Feel free to email me with an further information or questions at wood@finishes.direct

    All the Best Samantha.

  45. Robert Says:

    I have new fences and a new shed to protect. Do you recommend creocote as a long term solution? Or should I be using a more ordinary preservative such as Cuprinol or Ronseal?

  46. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good afternoon Robert,

    The Creocote will help to make the wood moisture repellent. It does not offer protection against mould mildew and rot. For this a preservative is required.

    For the best protection of exterior woods, we nearly always recommend a two coat system. A Preservative first to help prevent mould, mildew and rot. Followed by a top coat product to give moisture repellency. This can be the Creocote or an Oil such as Barrettine Decking Oil which is very versatile and can e used for a number of exterior projects.

    If you have a look at the recommendations and feel free to let me know if you have any further questions.

    kind regards Samantha.

  47. Mark Belcher Says:

    Hi there

    Just had a new tanalised garden shed fitted. Wondered which clear product I should put on it come spring time?

    Cheers for the steer, Regards, Mark

  48. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Morning Mark,

    You could have a look at the Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment. This is a clear oil that absorbs into the surface of the wood and helps to make it moisture repellent as well as offering some UV protection. A clear oil will darken the wood a little to give the ‘wet look’ and I would recommend a test area first. Have a read up of the product and feel free to get back to me if you have any other questions.

    All the Best Samantha.

  49. Hi Samantha Says:

    I have just built a large shiplap driveway gate out of pressure treated (brown colour) softwood. I would like to add a clear coat to further protect whilst maintaining the original colouring, and to seal ends and crosscuts made into the timber. The gate is fairly exposed and south facing. Are you able to help. Many thanks Paul

  50. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Paul,

    Can you tell me exactly what is on the wood at the moment ? And then I can narrow down some suitable products for your project.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  51. Hi Samantha Says:

    Hi Samantha, they couldn’t tell me exactly, but i’ve found out the brown colouring is a dye to indicate it has been pressure treated, and will fade to nothing in a season. So I guess it is just a standard pressure treatment for rot and fungi as found with decking timbers.
    Thanks

  52. Paul T Says:

    Recently had planters installed in garden (pressure treated railway sleepers (natural colour referred to as “green”).

    To maintain current look would like good UV protection to avoid silvering – planters colour looks better after rain so some partial wet look would be a bonus.

    Any ideas? thanks

  53. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Paul,

    You could have a look at an exterior treatment, such as Barrettine Wood Protective Treatment. This comes in a clear, which will darken the wood slightly, or a coloured finish, the darker the colour the more UV protection it will get.

    You can apply 2-3 coats to build up a protection for the wood and it will help to make the wood moisture repellent. Always try a test area first and if you have any questions, I am here to help.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  54. Andy Says:

    Hi. I have a 5m x 3m timber workshop which is one year old and is clad in smooth finish natural colour boarding. The cladding was factory dipped prior to it’s being built 0ne year ago. According to the supplier it has to be recoated after 1 year so can you please suggests the best system for doing it?

  55. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Andy,

    Thank you for getting in touch, I can recommend a good quality Preservative first to help to prevent mould, mildew and rot.

    Following this a good quality top coat to help make the wood moisture repellent and give UV protection to slow down the silvering process. If you are looking to keep a clear natural finish then you can look at the Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment, which is a great product for ease of application and maintenance over time.

    If you have a read up about products and feel free to get back to me if you have any further questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  56. Gabriel Coleman Says:

    Hi, my partner has a shelter for her horse. It’s in an exposed field that’s currently getting battered by the elements. One side of the shelter is soaked through to the inside and not getting chance to dry out. If I look to use an oil based repellent do I have to wait for the exterior wood to dry out before applying or could I apply to damp wood on a dry day? Thanks

  57. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Gabriel,

    It is essential that the wood is dry when application of oil is carried out and that you have a couple of dry days to carry out the project, I know that can be difficult in this country with such changeable weather. Sealing the wet wood will result in mould form fairly quickly.
    For the best protection I would also recommend Barrettine Premier Universal Preservative which will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot.

    If you have a look at these recommendations and feel free to get back to me if you have any further questions.

    Kindest Regards Samantha.

  58. Angela Sen Says:

    Dear Samantha,

    I have recently purchased two bird houses made out of pine. What would be the best wood treatment to preserve the wood and be safe for the birds.

    Many thanks for your help.

    Angela Sen

  59. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Angela,

    Its always difficult when it comes to treatments that are to be used around animals. Many of our products are safe once dry, its just during the application period that you have to take care. One product that I often recommend is the Barrettine Premier Wood Preserver.

    Barrettine Wood Preservative is perfectly safe to use on any surface that comes into contact with animals when dry. This includes but is not limited to dog kennels, chicken sheds and houses, horse stables and more. It’s important to remember that this wood preservation treatment should be over-coated with a suitable exterior wood oil or decking oil. Animals should only come into contact with the surface of the wood when both the wood preserver and oil have fully dried.

    It will help to prevent mould,mildew and rot and is available in colours or clear to suit your needs. I hope that helps and if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to get in touch.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  60. Dave Reid Says:

    Can you tell me what is the best clear water proofer for a workshop made of planed Tanalised timber. Dave

  61. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good afternoon Dave,

    Are you able to email me with some further details of your project. To include if the wood is exposed to the elements, wind, rain etc ? You could look at an Oil or Varnish for protection, oil will give a natural finish and varnish is a harder wearing surface sealer that is longer lasting. If you can email me at wood@finishes.direct with further details of your project and I can narrow down some possible products for you.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  62. Paul Brookes Says:

    Hi, I have a 200 year old south-facing, front door which I stripped back to bare wood. It’s made from walnut and has a natural, light colour. I coated this with linseed oil, which looked fantastic, but it has started to go mouldy and black – especially at the bottom. I saw your comments above about 6 monthly treatments with linseed oil but I’d like something that’s more maintenance-free which can bring out the grain a little and enhance the natural colour of the wood. Any suggestions?

  63. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Paul,

    Oils such as Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra are a good option for exterior doors, however like all other oils it will need regular maintenance to keep up the protection. Particularly for a south facing door. The Osmo will last longer than the Linseed Oil for sure, I would still recommend an annual top up in your case.

    Alternatively, you could have a look at the Sikkens range, starting with one coat of the Sikkens Cetol HLS Plus followed by two coats of the Sikkens Cetol Filter 7 Plus.

    This will give a durable and longer lasting finish. It can last a number of years and if maintained even longer. If you have a read up of the product and feel free to get back to me with any questions you have.

    Always try a test area first.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  64. Pat Says:

    Hi guys, I’ve got a wooden plaque (English oak) that I want to protect as much as possible from the weather. It’s position is staring straight at the sky so it’s got no positional advantage where direct sunlight / rain & general weather is concerned. Any idea what the best product/s to use might be? Thanks in advance

  65. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Pat,

    My first recommendation would be to apply a Preservative first. This will help protect the woods against mould, mildew and rot.

    You can follow this with a top coat of oil that will repel moisture and contain UV filters to slow down the silvering process. A good option is the Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra. For a small plaque you will need just the 125ml as with the preservative, a little goes a long way. One or two coats of the WR Basecoat followed by two thin coats of the oil. This is also easy to maintain over time, simply apply a fresh thin coat when you feel the wood needs it.

    If you have a read up of the products and feel free to get back to me with any questions you may have.

    All the Best Samantha.

  66. Chris Says:

    Hello

    Would appreciate advice on treating cedar beehives, many thanks

  67. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Chris,

    Beehives are always a difficult one to advice on, there are not many manufacturers who will say their product is suitable for use on Beehives and so we tend to recommend that you get in touch with the Bee keeping Society and see what they recommend. I wish I could be of more help on this one but would really hate to give a best guess when Bees are involved.

    Kindest Regards Samantha.

  68. John Says:

    Hi, last year I made a planter out of decking for my garden and treated the timber with linseed oil. After all the bad weather we’ve had its looking a bit shabby and I would like to know if I should keep putting linseed on it or would you recommend another type of treatment. Thanks John

  69. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello John.

    Thank you for getting in touch. The Barrettine Boiled Linseed Oil will certainly offer some protection to the wood, and give a warm tone.

    We do often recommend some alternative and more durable finishes that will give a longer protection. A preservative is always recommended as a first coat treatment to help prevent mould, mildew and rot. The Barrettine Premier Universal is a popular choice, and available in a 1 litre tin.

    Then a top coat of oil to help make the wood more moisture repellent and also slow down the silvering process caused by UV damage. Depending on the size of the planter you could potentially get away with the 125 ml tin of Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra as two very thin coats are all that are required. This will offer more durability than the Linseed oil.

    If you take a look at the products and should you have any further questions please do not hesitate to let me know. Always try a test area first.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  70. John Says:

    Hi, I’ve just built a 15 x 10 shed out of pressure treated smooth T&G. I would like to keep the natural colour, poss a golden brown. What would best to treat this. A lot of products specify rough sawn timber, which mine is not.

  71. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello John,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry, a popular choice for projects such as your is the Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment this is a clear oil that will soak into the surface of the wood, as you have smooth Tong and Groove it is likely to use slightly less than the coverage guidelines. It will help to make the wood moisture repellent and slow down the natural silvering process of the wood caused by UV damage.

    To maintain a good level of protection you can simply top up the oil annually or bi annually depending on when you feel the wood needs it. I hope that helps and if you have any questions at all please do let me know. Always try a test area first.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  72. Joel Says:

    Hello, have large log cabin approx 8years old. All in good condition but customer would like it given a clear look finish and something that’ll look after it for minimum 5years. Would rather not do two jobs ie preservative and then an overcoat but if this is only option then I’ll do it. Any suggestions?

  73. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Joel,

    Thank you for your question, it would be great if you could preserve and and protect in one treatment, unfortunately we do not have one treatment that will give a long lasting durability and for the best level of protection a base coat of a good quality preservative first to help prevent mould, mildew and rot. Followed by a top coat product to help slow down the silvering process caused by UV and make the wood moisture repellent.

    For the preservative I can recommend the Barrettine Premier Universal this is a clear product, although it may slightly darken the wood to give what we call the ‘wet look’

    One this is dry you can consider the Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment which is an oil that will soak into the surface of the wood and leave it looking and feeling natural.

    It will not last for five years however you can simply apply a fresh coat when you feel the wood needs it, this can depend on exposure to the elements and there will be no need to strip or sand back, just ensure that the surface is clean and dry.

    These products are recommended for application to bare wood and so if the Cabin currently has any treatment on it, let me know and I can advice accordingly.

    All the Best Samantha.

  74. Liz Says:

    Hi there

    We have east facing windows with wooden window frames which take a lot of punishment from the elements. They need to be treated and I wondered which would be best to use out of varnish, oil or paint. Ideally we’d like to keep the wooden look.

    Kind regards
    Liz

  75. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Liz,

    A great choice for joinery is Sikken Cetol HLS Plus one coat followed by two coats of the Sikkens Filter 7 Plus is a great combination for joinery and comes in a range of colours. It gives a very natural look and feel to the wood with exceptional durability and if well maintained over time will last for a long time.

    For further advice please feel free to get int ouch via our contact us page.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  76. Jon Says:

    Hi. Our house is 1930’s and has the original wooden oak door step on the front door. The door is in a porch so has some protection. The step was very dark in colour and looked scruffy….and so I was going to paint over it. However with a lot of sanding and planeing I now have a beautiful light coloured oak step…..
    The big question now is how do I keep it like that…..finish needs to be hard waring and I want to keep the colour light…..help please,

  77. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Jon,

    A little sanding and hard work can pay off! To protect it my best recommendation would be to use a Decking Oil. The reason for this is that thresholds and steps can get a lot of foot traffic and even though it is protected by your porch it will still need a product that can stand up to everyday footfall. The benefit of a Decking Oil is that it is also easy to maintain over time. When you feel that the wood needs it you can top up with another coat, just ensure that the wood is clean and dry before application.

    Possible options are Barrettine Decking Oil or Manns UV Decking Oil With thresholds there is no guarantee of how long protection will last for.

    As with all of our products a test area is recommended and a clear oil will darken the wood very slightly to give the ‘wet look’ and you can get an idea of this by wiping a damp cloth over the bare wood. I hope that helps some and if you have any further question please do not hesitate to contact us

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  78. Tim Walker Says:

    hi, I have just acquired a very solid kitchen table which I want to put in the garden, initially on the lawn but eventually on a patio. The legs are 90cm x 90cm wood, and painted white, though the underneath of the leg where it rests on the ground is unpainted. I was wondering about how best to prepare these legs for a long life in the garden. eg by soaking them in preservative before either painting again, or whether to strip them down completely? Also thinking of putting some kind of impermeable feet onto the legs to stop the damp coming straight into the legs.
    The top is polished hardwood, and I am thinking of rubbing it down and using a yacht type varnish. Any better ideas to maximise its chances in our weather please?
    thanks
    Tim

  79. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Tim,

    Thank you for your enquiry. If the paint is an interior one I would recommend stripping back to bare wood and re treating. Interior paint will not stand up to the elements of the outside.

    Once back to bare wood you can apply a good quality preservative Barrettine Premier Universal will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot, you can apply this liberally. And you are able to apply most paint finishes over this so you could look at the Ronseal Garden Paint for the legs to give an opaque finish.

    And then for the top of the table, Dulux offer a good quality Yacht Varnish >>> Dulux Trade Clear Gloss Yacht Varnish for exterior use.

    If you take a look at those products and if you have any questions I am here to help.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  80. Colleen Says:

    I have a black fence painted in cupinral fence life + with the blue lid. The sun has absolutely drained my fence and it is all flaking off – all I have to do is touch this cuprinral fence life + paint with the blue lid – what a disastrous decision – the only decision is to take it back to the bare wood – HELP.
    Colleen

  81. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Colleen,

    Do you mean the Ronseal Fence Life ? If the paint is already peeling and flaking there is a good chance that a pressure washer will help to remove a lot of the old product and bring it back to bare wood. If the wood is smooth then light sanding to remove any stubborn areas. Once back to bare wood this opens up your options for what to use to get the finish that you want. If you can take a look in the Fences section of our Website Garden Fence Treatments this has a wide range of options to consider.

    I hope that helps and if you have any questions at all please feel free to get back in touch via our contact us page.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  82. Anna Says:

    Hello,
    We have newly-made chestnut exterior gates. We would like to find a solution with the least possible maintenace – mainly avoiding having to sand and re-do every year. We get a lot of sun and rain damage to our wood here. I assume to avoid sanding I will have to keep the wood natural- looking, and not paint it with a colour?
    Thank you in advance

  83. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Anna,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry. For low maintenance and a natural finish you could consider the Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra this is a clear oil that soaks into the surface of the wood and enhances the natural colours and grain of the wood. It requires just two very thin coats for application, so a little goes a long way.

    Thin application is particularly important as Chestnut is a hardwood and will absorb less oil and it is important to not allow any oil to dry on the surface of the wood. So for the best application method use a suitable Mako Natural Bristle Woodcare Brush and then with a lint free cloth remove all excess oil.

    Test areas are vital to ensure you are getting the finish you desire and that the product is right for your wood, this oil requires application to bare wood. The benefit of an oil is that it will not peel and flake or need to be removed to refresh, simply ensure the wood is clean and dry and then apply a fresh coat when you feel the wood needs it. This can be annually or bi annually depending on exposure.

    If you have any questions please do let me know I will be happy to help.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  84. Richard De Russo Says:

    …. we will be installing birch venner rated fire doors (core is a plaster type filler) on the exterior of an old church. We decided on wood vs steel fire doors because of the difficulty of sizing eac door properly. All exterior doors are protected by a roof overhang and wwould rarely get wet except for a windy storm. What will be the best way to protect doors to last? I was thinking 3 coats oil poly.
    Thankj you

  85. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Richard,

    A good option for exterior oil is the Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra this is the external equivalent to the Polyx Oil. It is a clear oil that soaks into the surface of the wood and slows down the silvering process and repels moisture. You will only require two very thin coats applied and test areas are vital to ensure that you like the finish to be achieved and that it is suitable for your project.

    You can also increase the protection to the door by applying a preservative first , such as Osmo WR Basecoat this will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot.

    If you take a look at the products recommended and feel free to let me know if you have any further questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  86. Emma Says:

    Hello,
    I belong to a sailing club based directly on the seafront which needs a bit of a spruce up outside. It has 4 fairly large wooden bench tables which although are old are sound, so i want to brighten them up and give them protection. I don’t mind a 1-2 year recoverable but i don’t want to have to repaint them constantly through flaking or cracking paint.
    At the moment I’m thinking brown, but is there a colour paint that will work just as well? The biggest issue really is as they’re on the seafront there is no protection from the elements.
    Thank you

  87. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Morning Emma,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry. What you are able to use will depend on what is currently on the benches. If you have a varnished or painted finish currently on there and do not wish to remove it then a you will need to consider a similar product to go over the top after carrying out some preparation.

    If you are planning to strip the furniture back to bare wood however, this will open up your options for alternative and easier to maintain products.

    If you would like to email me via the contact us page and I can make some recommendations based on the information you send me about the current finish.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  88. Anthony Williams Says:

    Hello,

    I have built an outdoor bench using light coloured pressure treated kiln dried spruce. I’d like to protect it but also show the grain so I have considered yatch varnish but I don’t want the maintenance hassle so I am considering oils. I am also looking at a light warm coloured stain to the wood to enhance the colour.

    Can you recommend a stain and treatment that is easy to maintain and apply that won’t stain clothing when dry? The bench will be exposed to full sun and the elements all year.

    Many thanks.

  89. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Anthony,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry. I can recommend the Barrettine Garden Furniture Oil as a good option, easier to maintain and will enhance the natural tones and grain of the wood.

    To slow down the silvering effect of UV damage you could also look at the UV Protection Oil Extra this is a durable oil that requires just two thin coats for application. It will help to slow down the silvering process and make the wood moisture repellent. Osmo do not recommend it for horizontal surfaces, however for a bench I believe you will be fine, just ensure that you keep it maintained and add refresher coats when you feel that the wood needs it.

    Always try a test area first.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  90. Terry Matthews Says:

    Hi, I have an open fence with vertical slats. It’s about 20 years old and has had quite a number of treatments over the years – mainly Cuprinol. At the moment it is covered with a dark oak stain. I have jet washed it to remove green mould and it is now patchy.
    I’d like to stain it with a lighter colour -say medium oak -but I don’t particularly want to try and stripe the old colour off.
    Is there anything that will overcoat the dark stain with a lighter colour please?

    Regards,

    Terry Matthews

  91. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Morning Terry,

    Thank you for your questions, unfortunately it not possible to apply a lighter colour over the dark, it would just come out as a similar colour. It may be possible to apply a paint over the top and this will give an opaque finish to the wood that will cover the dark stain, it is essential to carry out a test area first, The test area is to check not only that you will like the colour but also that there are no compatibility or adhesion issues.

    For a paint to go over the top you could have a look at the Cuprinol Garden Shades you may find that you need and extra coat for full coverage and again test areas will show this.

    I hope this helps and if you have any questions at all you can get in touch via our contact us page.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  92. Robbie Says:

    Hi, I have a new 20ft x 20ft wooden garage that I want to protect. I’ve been advised oil based product would be best. Can you advise?? Just looking for a natural finish and something that protects the wood from the elements..
    Thanks in advance
    R

  93. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Robbie,

    My apologies for the delay in getting back to you with a response. Exterior Oils are often recommended as they have the benefit of being easy to maintain over time and Decking Oil is a great option to consider. It is a really versatile product that can be used for a wide range of projects not just decking.

    I can also recommend a preservative first and Barrettine have a very good product called Barrettine Premier Universal Preserver which will help to prevent mould and rot, it is a clear product although it will darken the wood slightly to give the ‘wet look’

    Once this has dried you can apply two coats of oil and here are two possible choices for you to consider Barrettine Decking Oil or the Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment both are oils that will penetrate the surface of the wood and repel moisture.

    Test areas are always recommended and advice is based on application to bare wood if you have any questions at all please feel free to get in touch via our contact page contact us page

    All the Best Samantha

  94. tony Says:

    Hi, I am building a 4x2x2 shed and thinking of using either osb 3 or ply to construct it. What would you recommend? And what preservative to use. Cheers..

  95. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Tony,

    I am sorry to say that building sheds and what to use is not my field of expertise. I can tell you that OSB can be problematic with many treatments as the adhesives and resins used to make it can repel may of the products.

    I can advice on products to use to protect your shed however and as a guideline I tend to recommend a preservative first to help prevent mould mildew and rot. Followed by an exterior oil to help make the wood moisture repellent.

    Some possible options for you to consider are the Barrettine Premier Universal or the Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative these can help to prevent mould, mildew and rot.

    And then a top coat product such as Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment to help make the wood moisture repellent.

    If you take a look at these products and feel free to come back to me if you have any questions.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  96. Ashley Forbes Says:

    I have 20 x 8ft x 4 ft sleepers im away to use in my garden for small retaining walls. They are already pressure treated but im wondering if a should apply a further coat of protection before i lay them down.
    Perhaps creocote ?? Any advice welcome thanks
    Ash

  97. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Ashley,

    It will only be of benefit to apply a good quality treatment such as Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative it is a good product for all round treatment, it will help prevent mould, mildew and rot and also contains some wax to help prevent water ingress. If you take a look at the product and feel free to get back to me if you have any questions.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  98. Paula Says:

    Hi,
    Is it ok to paint Sadolin Superdec onto new timber that has just had a covering of Thompson’s water seal?

    I’m guessing not but would appreciate some advice thanks.

  99. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Morning Paula,

    The Thompsons Water Seal will repel pretty much any product that you try to put on it. It is a very strong moisture repellent barrier and will cause issues with adhesion if you try to apply anything over the top.

    If there is anything else that I am able to help with please do let me know.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  100. Ciaran Says:

    Hi, we have recently installed 30m of new 2m high featheredge fencing around our garden and are obviously keen to get it into a preserved state asap. The boards are dry wood and untreated but have a greenish tinge which we quite like. Access at the moment is easy but will become more difficult as the project develops so we could do with something long lasting with either a clear or slightly green finish. We would be very grateful for your advice. Thanks, Ciaran

  101. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Ciaran,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry. I would recommend looking at the Barrettine Premier Wood Preservative this is available in clear or coloured finishes and will give great protection to your fence. The clear will darken the wood very slightly should you choose that one and it will help to prevent mould mildew and rot as well as offer some moisture repelency to the wood as it contains wax.

    As you are treating feather board it is likely that you will need more of the product than the coverage guide as the wood will be more porous and depending on how exposed the wood is to the elements, top ups can be done every few years, although for the best protection to your wood an annual refresher coat is recommended.

    Always try a test area first and if there is anything further that I can help with please do not hesitate to get in touch via our contact us page.

    Kind Regards Samantha

  102. Duncan Gill Says:

    Hello, I am currently constructing a greenhouse from reclaimed mahogany which will hopefully last a very long time. When it is completed I want it to be dark grey in colour, what would you recommend to both preserve and colour the wood

    Regards Duncan

  103. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello Duncan,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry. One option you could consider is the Osmo Country Colour this is a penetrative oil that colours and protects in just two thin coats. As you are applying to Mahogany this will impact on the colour that will be achieved and so a test area with a sample sachet is very important.

    The Country Colour will give an opaque paint like finish but still with a natural feel to it. It does protect against moisture ingress however it does not contain Biocides and so a preservative is recommended for application before the oil and a good option is the Osmo WR Basecoat

    Alternatively for a slight more natural and less opaque grey finish there is the Osmo Decking Oil which has a dark grey tone in its range. Although marketed for Decking it is very versatile and as long as it is applied thinly will also give great protection to your wood.

    If you check out these products and feel free to get back to me if you have any questions.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  104. Maureen Says:

    Have a bog standard garden fence and shed which have had to be painted with Cuprinol twice in the last four years despite the product saying it lasts five years. Is there a better product which would last longer?

  105. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Maureen,

    Durability of a treatment can depend on a number of factors that include, how exposed the fence is to the elements, what type of wood, any previous treatments, how well and often it is cleaned or maintained. 5 Years is a guide and quite optimistic for for a surface paint. Maintenance can be easy however if you tackle any areas of wear straight away this will help avoid damage and keep the paint lasting longer.

    Alternatives are available but can give a similar length of durability and protection and still require regular top ups. For further advice please feel free to call and speak to one of our friendly team on 01303 213838.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  106. Tracy Says:

    Hi I’m getting a 6x6ft garden bar and would like to keep it to a light wood colour. What would be the best protection to put on it?
    Thanks Tracy

  107. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Tracey,

    Thank you for getting in touch with us via our Blog. A garden bar is a great addition to any garden space and to keep a natural look to the wood, whilst offering great protection, my first recommendation will be to use a good quality preservative such as Barrettine Premier Universal Preservative this will help to prevent mould, mildew and rot. It is a clear finish but it will darken the wood very slightly.

    Then a top coat of exterior oil to give moisture repellency and slow down the silvering process of UV damage and for this there is a wide range of products but a couple to consider are the Osmo UV Protection Oil Extra this requires just two very thin coats for application.

    Another option is the Barrettine Garden Furniture Oil it will not peel and flake over time and is easy to maintain over time.

    If you have a look at these two and feel free to let me know if you have any questions, I am here to help. If you feel the something more durable is required then let me know and I can offer some alternative suggestions.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  108. Stuart C Says:

    Hi,
    We have just built a 5.5 x 4.5m log cabin (from TUIN).
    It comes untreated bare wood; TUIN have 6 different manufacturers they recommend, but they are all stains.
    Ideally we would like to paint the cabin to our colour choice. I know i will add preservative first, but what concerns me is what paint/protection to use that are compatible and UV stable.
    The cabin website says i need a micron thickness of 80-120um of protection??
    1 of the treatments they recomend would work out at £1050 to treat it! (carefree is £37.5 x 28L)
    What could we use that will afford it the same depth of protection, but at a sensible cost, and a colored finish?

    Thank you in advance.

  109. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Morning Stuart,

    I am sorry for the delay in getting back to you, I have to say that this is a set of requirement that I have not come across before when it comes to treating a Log Cabin, they are very specific. And I certainly would not expect a full treatment to protect the Cabin to come to that amount of money. I am not familiar with the Carefree and so its difficult to give comparison products, but I can recommend something that I believe will give a good level of protection and is easy to maintain over time.

    It can be dependant on the type of wood used, but I can recommend the Barrettine Premier Universal this will prevents wood boring insects, wood rotting fungi and blue stain and gives long lasting protection.

    Followed by two coats of a top coat product such as Barrettine Log Cabin Treatment this is a clear oil that will soak into the surface of the wood to give a moisture repellent finish that results in rain beading off the wood. As an estimet you will need to cover 40 m2 for your Cabin, this will require approximately 9-10 litre of the oil to complete 2 coats. Test areas are strongly advised.

    The oil will protect the preservative and so if you maintain the oil with an annual or bi annual top up depending on how exposed the cabin is then the preservative will not requre a top up for afew years.

    This is of course dependant on the type of wood you are applying to and if you have further details feel free to send via our contact us page.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  110. Mike Says:

    I’ve bought a house with wood frame doors and windows that have not been maintained.
    The insides of the doors/windows are in okay condition but the exterior surfaces are in bad condition so that doors/windows get soaked from rain and swell/jam making them difficult to open/close (after a decent hot spell allowing things to dry out they become easier to open/close again).

    I am not sure what the wood they are made from is but think it is pine. The exterior surfaces are not rotted but do have a number of cracks. What do you recommend to bring the frames back to a maintained condition? To help stop the water penetration I was thinking of filling the cracks with an exterior filler – would this be sensible to do?

    Regards,
    Mike.

  111. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Morning Mike,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your questions. The first thing to do is give the wood a good clean and perhaps a light sand. Good preparation is the key to a good finish. Once the wood is clean and ready I can recommend the Sikkens Cetol HLS Plus one coat followed by Sikkens Cetol Filter 7 two coats.

    These two products will give exceptional durability and enhance the natural beauty and depth of the grain. You can use a filler such as Ronseal High Performance Wood Filler as this is very versatile and can be over painted. Areas that are filler may have a slightly different appearance and test area are recommended at all stages of the project.

    If you take a look at the products to see if they are suitable for your needs and feel free to get back to me with any questions you may have.

    Kind Regards Samantha.

  112. John Owen Says:

    Dear Samantha ,
    Sorry lost your previous reply .
    Am removing old bungalow facia .Intend to replace with ,new pine shiplap ,total area about 10sqm.
    Please advise on best preservative undercoat and then Mahogany mat finish ,or suitable one coat /both sides application ,
    Many thanks ,
    John.

  113. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Hello John,

    Thank s for getting back to me, I previously advised – For a long lasting finish you could have a look at the Sikkens Cetol HLS Plus. This has a range of colours and you can apply 2-3 coats for a semi gloss, natural looking finish. It is brush application and if you are able to apply to both sides before installing this will also prolong the protection to the wood.

    I would expect this to last for a minimum of 5 years and possibly longer, depending on how exposed to the elements it is. A top up coat at the 5 year mark may help to prolong even further.

    I hope that helps and if you have any further questions please do not hesitate to get in touch.

    Kind regards Samantha.

  114. Vickie Says:

    Hi, I have just ordered a log cabin. It is made from untreated pine and will house a hot tub. What treatment/stain would you recommend internally and externally, keeping as natural colour ass possible?
    So far I have looked at sadolin and sikkens. But not sure which is best. Thanks

  115. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Vickie,

    Thank you for getting in touch with your enquiry. The Sadolin and Sikkens are pretty much like for like in terms of quality and protection, and will give great protection to your Log Cabin. Both ranges will require a two coat or even three coat system to give the best level of protection to your wood and so if you would like to email me with which option you prefer and I will be happy to give further advice on application and number coats, in which order will best suit your needs.

    These are both exterior ranges and so for the interior if you would like to look at a product such as the Fiddes Hard Wax Oil which will give a natural look and feel and will be easy to maintain over time.

    If you take a look and feel free to email me with any questions you have via our contact us page.

    Kind regards Samantha

  116. Phil Corby Says:

    I have recently made a cross as a grave marker made in mahogany, it looked lovely the colour was bright. Finished with spray polyurethane clear satin.
    One month later it looks vey tired, the sun has done it no favours an it looks in part quite grey and scruffy.

    Any advice please?

    Best

    Phil

  117. Samantha Taylor Says:

    Good Afternoon Phil,

    A clear product will give limited UV protection and if the product you have used does not have any UV protection this could be the reason that the wood has faded fairly quickly. Mahogany being a red in tone wood will be prone to fading slightly quicker than usual as this can be the nature of the colour red.

    Are you able to let me know what product you have used Phil and if you are planning to sand back ? Details can be sent to me via our contact us page and I will happily advice further.

    Kind regards Samantha.

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