Wood Preserver FAQ's

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Do I need to use a wood preserver when oiling exterior wood?

While you can oil exterior wood without using a preservative first, we recommend using a wood preservative. Whilst wood oils protect against the effects of weathering, rain and sun damage, a preserver will protect the wood against mould, algae, wood boring insects and rot, elements that a wood oil alone cannot protect against.

Can I paint over wood that has been treated with a wood preservative?

This depends on what sort of preservative and what sort of paint is being used. Normal tanalised wood for example can usually be painted with any suitable exterior wood paint. If the wood is to be treated with an exterior wood preservative, then painted with a water based exterior wood paint, it's important to ensure that the wood preservative being used does not contain any wax, oil or silicon, as these will repel the water content of the paint and prevent it from sticking or adhering to the wood. We recommend that when preserving and painting wood, a test area is treated first to check product suitability and compatibility.

Will a coloured wood preservative produce the same colour finish on my old fence panels and newly replaced panels?

The colour on the new fence panels is unlikely to match the colour of the old panels even when treated with the same product. Unfortunately, this is the nature of wood. Every piece of wood is affected by type, age and condition and will respond differently when a wood finishing product such as a coloured wood preservative is applied. If the older panels appear to be a lighter colour than the new treated ones, an additional coat of preservative can be applied to the older panels to strengthen the colour and achieve a better colour match to the new or vice versa. The colour of newly applied preservative will settle down after a couple of weeks of weathering.

Can wood preservatives be used to preserve animal enclosures?

The wood preservers we sell are safe for man, animal and plants when fully dry. This makes them suitable for use on dog kennels, horse stables and other animal enclosures. By their nature, wood preservatives are designed to protect wood from wood boring insects so are therefore not suitable for use on beehives or insect houses. if you would like to protect your beehive or insect house choose a product without biocides and insecticides.

I need advise on how to treat woodworm?

Active woodworm needs to be treated with a woodworm killer. The wood should then be treated with a suitable interior or exterior wood preservative which will help to prevent future infestation. See our full range of woodworm treatment products and wood preservatives. Wood that has been finished such as furniture, floorboards and doors should be stripped of any wax, oil, varnish or paint to ensure that the woodworm treatment and following preservative is able to effectively penetrate in to the surface of the wood grain. If you want to use a water based paint over a preservative use one that does not contain wax.

Can a wood preservative be used on wood surrounding a fish pond?

Wood preservatives are harmful to aquatic systems such as fish ponds and will likely kill the fish if any is splashed or leaks in to the fish pond. If possible, the wood should be taken to a safe location away from the pond and treated. It should then be allowed to dry for the full manufacturers recommended drying time. We recommend treating the wood after preserving with a suitable exterior wood oil before relocating back to the pond areas. The oil will help to seal in the preservative and further protect the wood from the damp and moist environment.

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